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Thread: Bullet Seating Depth

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    11
    Quote Originally Posted by classcat View Post
    Not the length, but the diameter. Uneven neck tension can give you uneven seating depths. Light neck tension will yield the same results.
    This may be part of the problem. I have noticed differences in force required when seating the bullets.
    I will try to correlate this with the seating depth.
    Thnx

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Al Nyhus View Post
    On your ogive tool...is the hole where the bullet inserts chamfered or not? -Al
    Very slight chamfer, but I get your point. I am beginning to get a cleared picture.

  3. #18
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    Apr 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneT View Post
    I have had this same problem. I think it's due to a variation in insertion force on the gauge. The gauge relies on the lands of the barrel to stop the bullet, but a little engraving is easy to achieve. Apply the gauge carefully, such that your measurement device isn't compressing it into the lands (i.e. a light touch) and you may see better consistency. (Worked for me, anyway.)
    GsT
    I will give this a try, lighter touch so to speak. Thank you-

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    11
    Quote Originally Posted by retired View Post
    My OPINION, is that with that "tool"
    you cannot measure uniformly, because you cannot control
    how far into the lands you are pushing the bullet when measuring.
    .002 is nothing. The taper on the throat and the taper to the bullet make this very hard to do.
    Maybe with an optical comparitor
    IMHO, you need a bullet ogive tool sinclair stoneypoint, so you measure to a point,
    not trying to measure while not going into the lands.
    Thank you for your input, I will check this out.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Chehalis, WA.
    Posts
    91
    Scott,

    Check the overall length of the bullets you are shooting before you seat them. Even match bullets are not all exactly the same length. If your seating die is touching the ogive only for seating, and the bullets vary slightly in length, you will see a difference in LOA measurement, which I have found means nothing on the target as it is usually so little. It the variations in the wind flags that cause the problems!!

    FWIW
    Steve Kostanich

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
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    11
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Kostanich View Post
    Scott,

    Check the overall length of the bullets you are shooting before you seat them. Even match bullets are not all exactly the same length. If your seating die is touching the ogive only for seating, and the bullets vary slightly in length, you will see a difference in LOA measurement, which I have found means nothing on the target as it is usually so little. It the variations in the wind flags that cause the problems!!

    FWIW
    Steve Kostanich
    Thanks for your input Steve. I do check the bullets from time to time and have noticed as .003 on some Bergers.
    Darn those wind flags!

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    867
    Reminds me of the sign on the wall at the headquarters of the last Bill Clinton campaign, "it's the economy stupid". In our case....."it's the wind flags stupid". 90% of all the goofy anal stuff we do means absolutely nothing if we miss that switch on the 4th flag. I'm not all that sure it means anything anyway.

    Rick

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,297
    Quote Originally Posted by Greyfox View Post
    Reminds me of the sign on the wall at the headquarters of the last Bill Clinton campaign, "it's the economy stupid". In our case....."it's the wind flags stupid". 90% of all the goofy anal stuff we do means absolutely nothing if we miss that switch on the 4th flag. I'm not all that sure it means anything anyway.

    Rick
    Speaking of wind and windflags, if you can find a small farm pond, say about 1 acre, go sit and watch the wind pattern on the water. In centerfire benchrest we normally use 3 or 4 flags for the first 100 yards and only 2 more in the second 100. Note the wind pattern on the pond, there can be much wind activity between the flags. That is why many rimfire shooters use as many as 10 windflags in just 50 yards.

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  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    867
    Quote Originally Posted by JerrySharrett View Post
    Speaking of wind and windflags, if you can find a small farm pond, say about 1 acre, go sit and watch the wind pattern on the water. In centerfire benchrest we normally use 3 or 4 flags for the first 100 yards and only 2 more in the second 100. Note the wind pattern on the pond, there can be much wind activity between the flags. That is why many rimfire shooters use as many as 10 windflags in just 50 yards.
    .
    Good idea Jerry. I typically use 5 flags @ 100 and add another 3 for 200. I think I use more than anyone I shoot with. Sometimes even those aren't enough, but I haven't learned to deal with more. I could probably be convinced that some of the things benchrest shooters do to cases and such are important, but I believe pretty strongly that it's the shooters that get plenty of practice are the most consistent winners. This would say to me that they understand wind and bench manners.

    Rick

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